Informations Systems Consultant

Posts tagged ‘Uhuru Kenyatta’

Memory Refresh: Solving Nairobi Traffic


Good Morning Your Excellency Governor Mike Mbuvi Sonko,

We are grateful that you have lifted the ban. I am sure your intentions for signing the bill into law was informed by the need to make Nairobi a great, clean and traffic fluid city. I hope you remember the days of Kenya Bus Services. In your deliberations with other stakeholders, you could consider those long routes that used to cut across our city. You can also consider having a time based traffic management policy for the routes.

KBS 34

Here is what I mean. We had no 52 – that would start from Dandora and go all the way to Ngong, We had no 42a&b that would start in Dandora into town via Juja Road then proceed to Ayany. There were many other like no 17b that would start from Kasarani bia Kayole and terminate in Karen etc. remember our Governor that they all had a time schedule with a bus leaving every 5 to 10mins. And the stage stops were also controlled between 2 to 5mins.

If this were to be implemented to cut across Kiambu, Kajiado, Machakos and other neighbouring counties your Excellency – we will create more opportunities for traffic marshals to enforce time schedules – equip each sub-county terminus as we have done for the bus station in town (all terminus areas will have more business opportunities as spurred by human traffic) We will also create inspector jobs within the saccos which can be in shifts and covering every three to five stages to check tickets, seat beats,bus cleanliness, passenger manifest etc. Since the routes will be longer drivers and conductors will have shifts thus the need to have more of them.

Related image

This can be piloted with bus coaches that can carry more than 30 passengers to be effective and can slowly be accelerated into the BRT strategy so that higher passenger capacity buses are deployed to ply the routes. You will have helped traders and children who criss cross the city for trade and education. This will enhance traffic efficiency, spur an almost 24hour bus transit business thus boost the economy, will be easy to enforce safety for passengers and all citizens. I trust this among other considerations will help ease traffic within the city. #keeptrusting

Regards, Lunani Joseph

Lunani Joseph

Acknowledgement: KBS#34 Picture is from KenyanList.com Webpage and the NEoplan 122 Seater Bus is from autoline.info webpage.

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No folly without a dolly


Historical studies almost prove that there is nothing new to this world. Yes, there is advancement in many areas around the human race but our actions more often than not follow patterns of yester years. Archaelogical studies confirm written history on religion, arts and science. I therefore hold as true what the writer of Ecclesiastes states that everything under the earth has been there before. Probably differing in form or spirit but bound together in many similarities.

This stamped authority to our forefathers warnings, admonitions, philosophy and proverbs. We need hind sight and insights from the past to chart better our course in the present and the future. Each one of us requires a compass and what better way than a North to refer to. Our north in socio-political, medical, technology, the arts and whatever else should always remain true.

It is possible many of us go on with our daily lives not knowing what our true north is. In the literal form this could be our principles, value system and reference virtues. Just like the geographical north, we require unchanging, tested and proven foundations to back our reference virtues.

Our clamour to understand the past then is justified and explains the millions spent in research of history in all our unique subjects. There has never been a time so crucial in the history of Kenya as a country as now. We need more understanding in how this country was founded. The intrigues behind the scenes pre-colonial, colonial and post colonial times. A critical look at how we lived as communities, how we governed ourselves before the “visitors” came and how we changed. For the “visitors” to have found virgin land then in a paradox found indigenous workers to staff and operationalise development in their knowledge is a good joke.

Far from the antics of the “visitors” to disorient and re-programme communities that were assumed primitive and savage living; Kenya is now a country bound by marked borders, disputed islands, one governance structure and a constitution assimilated at independence, amended over time and reviewed in the recent past. The drama in between this metamorphosis is still scarcely documented and we have side stories that we all enjoy to hear. Some laden with so much exaggeration, half truths and fictional effects that can rival Oscar awarded pieces.

Documented or not these stories are being told and sadly shape many minds into mediocrity, nepotism, tribalism and birth corruption seeds. “Wale walituibia; sisi tumenyanyaswa; kila mtu anajitetea ; mtu wetu ndio tunataka;” among other pseudo community phrases are free radio words in our present society. We may fault the government but its folly is a tapestry of our communal thoughts and actions. We¬† feed its engines with “our people” who in turn have ” their people”, who form inner circles for “their bidding” then we collectively expect to be “in benefit”. When names are thrown in the thresh-floor of appointing ears, we fall over ourselves in prediction spins and even the dramatic rumour milling to fervent prayer including professional lobbying.

We now have a “handshake” brokered peace among two debatable¬† kingpins of two factions of the country. Surprisingly none of them has complete authority over the said factions. This is evidenced in the JKIA runaway drama. It is good fodder for media houses and political banter but shamefully it is the undoing of Kenya. Behind the scenes we have disconnected and disenfranchised handlers of the dolly and thus the folly.

May peace prevail, may rights be honoured, may our governance be in harmony, may our peoples behave and may we see Kenya rise. God bless Kenya!

 

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