Posted in Challenges, Need Intervention, Relevant, Technology

The New Normal: Covid-19 Carry Forwards


We have been dealt a blow in our diverse ways and means as a people of the universe by this pandemic. We may cry foul and whine all we want but that is life’s curve ball thrown at us. We have a duty for our own posterity to do what it takes to mitigate, control, alleviate and extinguish the adverse effects of the corona virus in this time and age. As a pragmatist we have to look at the new normal going forward. This is a preview of the main feature that we yet do not know when it will open up in our world theatre stage. So as such we have to prepare and inculcate lessons learnt and good practices acquired long before and during this period. I agree with many clean freaks now that there can never be too much cleaning or sanitizing or even disinfecting of ourselves, surfaces, items and spaces around us. Truly cleanliness is divine and since it is next to godliness then no disease survives when we pursue cleanliness.

I believe strongly going forward the following need to be our new normal as responsible citizens of the world.

  1. All airports, border points and passenger terminals require disinfecting stations – medical checks booths and quarantine protocols of any disturbing discovered vitals for passengers. There should be no exceptions.
  2. Sanitation points should be mandatory for public space, restaurants, food courts, sporting facilities, religious spaces and learning institutions.
  3. Personal Hygiene policies should be adopted into laws and by all entities to safeguard those that patronize their premises. The distance of 1.5m or 2m between queues is a great gain of order and safeguarding each person’s hygiene. It would be a natural antidote to pickpockets. Anyone who is unwell should have a facial mask of N95 standards – this would end the cold and flu outbreaks we witness every other season. People that have a cough or sneeze should be held responsible if they infect others when they do not protect themselves by regularly sanitizing and wearing of a facial mask.
  4. Embrace Digital transformation in how we work, relate and socialize. We can save a lot by using technology. Many meetings that would have ended up in a long trip that deprives families of their loved ones time can be done online and leave travel for the most critical and confidential ones. Let travel be about holidays.
  5. Have regular disinfecting programs for public and private spaces. This will help deal with the clutter, garbage and sewage problem that burdens our societies. They are the source of many diseases.
  6. Regularly review our business continuity plans as governments, government related organizations, religious organizations, learning institutions and private institutions including families. Each government (main or regional) and other public and private organizations need to have dire measures protocols they can enact in combating issues of great disruption like this pandemic. This means governments need to create incentives for the populace to save and invest but more keenly develop resiliency for at least one year lockdown eventualities. How can we be creative so that taxes are not seen as burden and as such have more people be capable and willing to pay them? How can we show value so that taxes generated end up doing more good to the people and thus enhance their resolve to support good governance? How can we individual be now intentional in building reserves for our families starting with a month’s provision then build to years of essential provisions? Can education be more affordable if we adopt technology? Can government and business be less expensive if we genuinely implement systems and use technology? I still don’t understand why we use email and cannot use the same technology for public participation and tenders submission in totality not partial enforcements.
  7. Leaders’ responsibility over their units of mandate need to go deeper. We have seen leadership from leaders once perceived as weak or non-discerning. While the eloquent and loud have been embarrassingly shooting their feet by queer non-stellar interventions that are a show of nothing short of foolishness. The reliefs governments and businesses have given people across the world should continue. The goodwill earned therein will catapult those countries and businesses even higher. The key word here being “implementation” many declarations will not see the light of day. But a day of reckoning is coming. The internet does not forget – many leaders will be quoted in days to come and held to account over the declaration of relief that will not have been implemented. Here in Kenya we have seen how election promises made in the high of campaigns are being replayed. The disdain and doubt now dealt on those that made their election promises is appalling. Let the relief declarations made in the wake of COVID-19 not be akin to unmet election promises.

By Lunani Joseph

The writer is a technology solutions architect and works with Insynque Solutions as the Managing Director and Lead Consultant. Pictures are courtesy of tipsmake.com and Twitter handle @ThikaTowntoday

Posted in Challenges, Need Intervention, Technology

29th September 2011
Lessons from Senegal and why the Leadership is Comfortably sleeping in Power.

I am seated in Hotel La Resident Restaurant reminiscing my experience of Dakar. The other day I took a walk to the local shopping and what struck me was the amount of imported merchandise that the Country gets as local supplies.
A country surrounded by the sea, yet all it consumes is very foreign products.
I have been sneering at the fact of the local cuisine comprising of fish and rice meals repeated all over the day. That is nasty.

The country does a lot of fishing, however the amount of catastrophic danger that the country is undergoing is so humongous that one wonders how the populace will survive generations to come.

Now, the city of Saint Louis is an old colonial former Senegal’s capital before Dakar. The city has been abandoned with no caution. The streets are littered,the river is dirty with garbage from human activity, the cities transport system occasioned by very old junky locomotives (read taxis and one other matatu like moving structure). The amount of filth and stench that is in Saint Louis City is insurmountable and not tolerable at all for a tourist attraction.

One good thing is the people are jovial French Wolof speaking lot. Their mannerisms are good and I haven’t experienced any form of violence or muggings or even hooliganism common in many of the world capitals.

The buildings are colonial and 90% very old models and no one is thinking of revamping them. If the city council whose Mayor I have met before could concentrate on sanitation and other urban planning concepts, Saint Louis would be a very lovely place to come and wind away your worries.

So if you are planning to visit Senegal, prepare your French skills early in advance especially if you are English speaking. Also prepare for a strict French Cuisine in most of the eateries. However food is very cheap and pocket friendly, challenge is there is very limited choice.

I am however glad that I am training a group of 16 youth leaders known as the Green Teams, on green enterprise development and climate change mitigation measures. It is my hope that they will be equipped with the necessary skills to distinguish them from the rest of idle youth in the city and that a few years from now their businesses will thrive and be the drivers of the economy in a sustainable Saint Louis City.

The young people of Senegal must wake up now and save their country from foreign invasion by both the East and West. There is no excuse whatsoever for the people of Senegal with such beautiful climatic conditions to be taking tea imported from China. it is unacceptable the amount of comfort derived from deplorable conditions of living. the current Leadership of President Wade has failed and the people need to realize that the future depends on them.

A better Africa is possible.

Emmanuel Dennis

Posted in Challenges, Thumbs Up

Legacy or just History


Yesterday, we did lay Mzee Moinkett to rest in his Isinya farm. He notably was the champion and pioneer of Isinya town and served as their chief in the seventies and councillor later on. He was known for his integrity and genuine concern for the development of his people. He was father to 33 children, 13 gents and 20 ladies. His 95 grandchildren and tens of great grandchildren were present to pay their last respects.

He lived life with gusto, was taught by the missionaries and still held his people close to heart. He was a well acclaimed moran and stood for peace, growth and prosperity. Under his leadership the area saw the building of learning institutions among many other development initiatives. He was known to foster relationships even when others out-rightly did wrong him. He had time for all his children and attended to all individually. he made time for all and called for collective responsibility in his family and area at large.

Having met him as  my friend Wesonga asked him for his daughter Sereu for her hand in marriage; he had the aura of a sober, wise and humble father. He said much without many words. He guided the process with charisma and flair. His mentions were that of blessing unto the couple, their dealings and descendants. So when the wedding day arrived and I was asked to chauffeur them to the function, I gladly accepted. It was an honour. During the drive he made comments of peace, prompting me to work harder and blessed me. Such was the Mzee Moinkett.

He left behind a rich legacy and even in his last moments he did attend to his people. Having a good laugh with them and when he breathed his last he truly found his rest.

This is a challenge to all of us with many days to live. We ought to serve our family, people, country and world in our capacities. Fostering peace and development. Wishing all people well and doing good. Rest in peace Mzee Moinkett