Informations Systems Consultant

Posts tagged ‘history’

No folly without a dolly


Historical studies almost prove that there is nothing new to this world. Yes, there is advancement in many areas around the human race but our actions more often than not follow patterns of yester years. Archaelogical studies confirm written history on religion, arts and science. I therefore hold as true what the writer of Ecclesiastes states that everything under the earth has been there before. Probably differing in form or spirit but bound together in many similarities.

This stamped authority to our forefathers warnings, admonitions, philosophy and proverbs. We need hind sight and insights from the past to chart better our course in the present and the future. Each one of us requires a compass and what better way than a North to refer to. Our north in socio-political, medical, technology, the arts and whatever else should always remain true.

It is possible many of us go on with our daily lives not knowing what our true north is. In the literal form this could be our principles, value system and reference virtues. Just like the geographical north, we require unchanging, tested and proven foundations to back our reference virtues.

Our clamour to understand the past then is justified and explains the millions spent in research of history in all our unique subjects. There has never been a time so crucial in the history of Kenya as a country as now. We need more understanding in how this country was founded. The intrigues behind the scenes pre-colonial, colonial and post colonial times. A critical look at how we lived as communities, how we governed ourselves before the “visitors” came and how we changed. For the “visitors” to have found virgin land then in a paradox found indigenous workers to staff and operationalise development in their knowledge is a good joke.

Far from the antics of the “visitors” to disorient and re-programme communities that were assumed primitive and savage living; Kenya is now a country bound by marked borders, disputed islands, one governance structure and a constitution assimilated at independence, amended over time and reviewed in the recent past. The drama in between this metamorphosis is still scarcely documented and we have side stories that we all enjoy to hear. Some laden with so much exaggeration, half truths and fictional effects that can rival Oscar awarded pieces.

Documented or not these stories are being told and sadly shape many minds into mediocrity, nepotism, tribalism and birth corruption seeds. “Wale walituibia; sisi tumenyanyaswa; kila mtu anajitetea ; mtu wetu ndio tunataka;” among other pseudo community phrases are free radio words in our present society. We may fault the government but its folly is a tapestry of our communal thoughts and actions. We  feed its engines with “our people” who in turn have ” their people”, who form inner circles for “their bidding” then we collectively expect to be “in benefit”. When names are thrown in the thresh-floor of appointing ears, we fall over ourselves in prediction spins and even the dramatic rumour milling to fervent prayer including professional lobbying.

We now have a “handshake” brokered peace among two debatable  kingpins of two factions of the country. Surprisingly none of them has complete authority over the said factions. This is evidenced in the JKIA runaway drama. It is good fodder for media houses and political banter but shamefully it is the undoing of Kenya. Behind the scenes we have disconnected and disenfranchised handlers of the dolly and thus the folly.

May peace prevail, may rights be honoured, may our governance be in harmony, may our peoples behave and may we see Kenya rise. God bless Kenya!

 

Advertisements

Legacy or just History


Yesterday, we did lay Mzee Moinkett to rest in his Isinya farm. He notably was the champion and pioneer of Isinya town and served as their chief in the seventies and councillor later on. He was known for his integrity and genuine concern for the development of his people. He was father to 33 children, 13 gents and 20 ladies. His 95 grandchildren and tens of great grandchildren were present to pay their last respects.

He lived life with gusto, was taught by the missionaries and still held his people close to heart. He was a well acclaimed moran and stood for peace, growth and prosperity. Under his leadership the area saw the building of learning institutions among many other development initiatives. He was known to foster relationships even when others out-rightly did wrong him. He had time for all his children and attended to all individually. he made time for all and called for collective responsibility in his family and area at large.

Having met him as  my friend Wesonga asked him for his daughter Sereu for her hand in marriage; he had the aura of a sober, wise and humble father. He said much without many words. He guided the process with charisma and flair. His mentions were that of blessing unto the couple, their dealings and descendants. So when the wedding day arrived and I was asked to chauffeur them to the function, I gladly accepted. It was an honour. During the drive he made comments of peace, prompting me to work harder and blessed me. Such was the Mzee Moinkett.

He left behind a rich legacy and even in his last moments he did attend to his people. Having a good laugh with them and when he breathed his last he truly found his rest.

This is a challenge to all of us with many days to live. We ought to serve our family, people, country and world in our capacities. Fostering peace and development. Wishing all people well and doing good. Rest in peace Mzee Moinkett

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: