Informations Systems Consultant

Posts tagged ‘growth’

7 Ways to Make Out of a Rut Stretch


Driving in unmarked roads will sure get you stuck between paths and by-ways. The terrain is normally uneven and springs surprises unto even the most discerning driver. There will be twigs to contend with, there will be sand pits that feign stability but give way too easily, there will be a bump that will require wedges to maneuver and a winch if not the tug of strong five or more men.

muddy ruts

Growing up in the village we witnessed many a vehicle get stuck especially during rainy seasons on our murram roads. It never made sense when they called them “all weather roads” – but then again it has a twisted meaning. That they will weather you out in all seasons. During the rains they would be muddy and a sore to motorists and pedestrians. While during the sunny season the vehicles would leave behind a train of smoky wafts of dust and grit to the pedestrians.

It is in the observations of seasoned drivers that I horned skills of getting out of ruts and continue to apply this as my journeys take me through scary ruts in the expanse of this country and beyond. Here are seven pointers to help you get out of ruts:

  1. Get out and scout the ruts

If by chance you never saw the ruts and got in abruptly then you have to stop and take stock. Do not under estimate a rut – small ruts can suck all your energy and still be stuck for hours if not days. Get out scout the area of the rut. Look for the smallest areas of advantage. It could be a strip of a stone or a hint of rock. That could be the much needed break to get you out of the ruts. Life has such and good breaks out of difficult times are often from unlikely sources. Look within and without for that advantage.

  1. Read signs, research routes and seasons

When you are forewarned you are forearmed. Knowing crucial information about a route or a venture from the onset is the best way to beat any eventualities. But then again if you find out that what you know is contrary to what you find on the ground then quickly un-learn, relearn and adapt. Flexibility is what makes the most of adventures and how charming are the stories to share from the experiences.

  1. Get tools and customize equipment or things

We have modern tools like a winch and the like then we have those that you build on site just to get out of ruts. We once got stuck in a small rut in the outskirts of Lugari forest with my wife and we built a raft like thing out of twigs and grass. And when we were almost out and noticed our raft like tool was short she threw in one of the car mats and guess what? We got out – though that action got her right in the pathway of mud as I stepped on the gas.

  1. Call in help early enough

Never assume a rut. Any problem that looks simple for you to solve might get you bogged down. This one time in the company of my wife, daughter and her nanny we set off in our Toyota Hilux double cabin pickup for our upcountry home. We arrived in the rain and the last stretch off the tarmac was muddy as usual. I have used this road for many years and never have I been stuck even in a two wheel drive vehicle. My assumption of driving a four wheel drive got us right in a deep rut. Another assumption of the rut got me revving up and before we knew it, an hour had passed. All this time I had ignored the free help that had availed itself as a small crowd had gathered around about the vehicle. Had I tapped into their help early enough then I would have been out in a jiffy. When I finally humbly asked them to help, those Luhya men about thirteen of them lifted the 4X4 from the rut in under 20minutes. Little did I know that a cane moving tractor had made the rut deeper and no matter how hard I stepped on the gas with the shaft firmly put in the rut I was not making progress but digging deeper. To date my wife remembers those men and how they loosely suggested and lifted the car out. “Si tupepeko hii kari tuitoeko kwa shimo mpaka pale” loosely translated as “Why don’t we lift this car from this rut to that place”. We laughed at their deep Luhya accent. And gasped as well at their demonstration of will and strength.

  1. Innovate and improvise quickly to start making progress however little

Ruts are always treacherous. They feign their looks and can deceive many. In business there are many problems that can rock the firm especially cashflow. When clients show difficulty in paying up; quickly discuss a payment plan with them DO NOT WAIT. However little the progress made reflects on the full amount – take it and review regularly. This also goes for supplier payments. When projected income is not netted as envisaged, go ahead and start a drawdown on the amount you owe them. A rut stretch however treacherous can be conquered in time as you make small movements. Always aim for the next jolt and step forward.

  1. Build up your guts and faith as the help feeds on it

Just like a fire needs kindling so does the help in moving out of a rut stretch. Remember to help them see the outcome you want. Then aim for small forward steps. Applaud them, get to know them in between breaths and call out to them respectfully. Show them how to handle your vehicle if you are particular about marks and dents. Cheer them up and offer your friendship as you never know when again you will meet. I have made good friends around the country from such situations and some have turned out to be very solid bankable relations.

  1. Learn: Listen, Look-up, Link up and move out

Being stuck in the rut slows you down. You can choose to whine on the time lost, dents caused and any other bad thing or create a knowledge base out of it. God has a funny sense of humour and he will use a rut stretch to get your attention. Learn the area of the rut, the people culture, take in the scenery, make friends and most importantly take lessons from the “being stuck” position. When you can draw “the what not to do”, “how to” and “why you do” then you have grown from the stuck position and may never get stuck in similar situations again. Many guys you have been stuck before in ruts – go back and kit their vehicles from the knowledge they gather in different terrains. Such that they are always better prepared when they encounter ruts again.

As we pursue our resolutions this year I pray we will all get out of the rut stretch; in relationships, business even spiritual matters and be well into growing for the better.

Weights for Growth


I did like a post by a friend of mine “Silvestre Namagwa” which said:-
Smooth roads never make good drivers
Smooth sea never makes good sailors
Clear Skies never make good Pilots .

Problem and hassle free Life NEVER makes a person strong
Be Strong enough to accept the challenges of Life
Don’t ask Life , “Why Me ? .

Instead say “Try Me !” – Anonymous

This reminded me of pointers that I have come to appreciate along the way. For anyone to grow their muscles they need to exercise and eat well. This does not mean they will exercise anyhow but will have a set of  measured exercises everyday. The diet also will not be hapharzard in quantity or type but strategic in quality,portions and timing.

To sustain that growth they have to keep on adjusting their exercises and diet consistently. This applies to learning too. We did start off with easy bits in nursery. We were guided into harder bits overtime consistently until our strengths were discovered. The idea is to stretch tenderly. Giving today more than what was given earlier.

This should be borrowed and practiced in all aspects of life. And Apostle Paul extols this in the book of Corinthians, where he mentions that after accepting Christ Christians are fed unto the “milk”  of spiritual food and weaned slowly unto “hard” spiritual food.

In business we ought to stride in step with the endless challenges. we need to feed our risk appetite gradually. Taking calculated risks that grow overtime. To build muscles in any capacity we need to exercise with an increasing mode. This will help us achieve the very best.

In ICT infrastructure firms have to be deliberate and phase out old technology while incorporating new technology. This will decrease the cost of total overhauls and boost the production levels.

Legacy or just History


Yesterday, we did lay Mzee Moinkett to rest in his Isinya farm. He notably was the champion and pioneer of Isinya town and served as their chief in the seventies and councillor later on. He was known for his integrity and genuine concern for the development of his people. He was father to 33 children, 13 gents and 20 ladies. His 95 grandchildren and tens of great grandchildren were present to pay their last respects.

He lived life with gusto, was taught by the missionaries and still held his people close to heart. He was a well acclaimed moran and stood for peace, growth and prosperity. Under his leadership the area saw the building of learning institutions among many other development initiatives. He was known to foster relationships even when others out-rightly did wrong him. He had time for all his children and attended to all individually. he made time for all and called for collective responsibility in his family and area at large.

Having met him as  my friend Wesonga asked him for his daughter Sereu for her hand in marriage; he had the aura of a sober, wise and humble father. He said much without many words. He guided the process with charisma and flair. His mentions were that of blessing unto the couple, their dealings and descendants. So when the wedding day arrived and I was asked to chauffeur them to the function, I gladly accepted. It was an honour. During the drive he made comments of peace, prompting me to work harder and blessed me. Such was the Mzee Moinkett.

He left behind a rich legacy and even in his last moments he did attend to his people. Having a good laugh with them and when he breathed his last he truly found his rest.

This is a challenge to all of us with many days to live. We ought to serve our family, people, country and world in our capacities. Fostering peace and development. Wishing all people well and doing good. Rest in peace Mzee Moinkett

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: